Episode 52 – Time Bandits (1981)

Bill and Ted discuss Terry Gilliam’s 1981 Python-esque “Time Bandits” which focuses on a ten-year old boy, Kevin, who goes on an adventure through time with a band of would-be bandits on the lam having absconded with the Supreme Beings’ map of all the holes in the fabric of time. Filled with fun cameos from the likes of Sean Connery, Shelley Duvall, and John Cleese, Gilliam makes a kid’s film that doesn’t talk down to its audience. Part of a trilogy of film by Gilliam dealing with the imagination which also includes “Brazil” (1985) and “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen” (1989) Time Bandits is more concerned with questions of good and evil than the typical time travel obsession with causality.

If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989), Groundhog Day (1993) 12 Monkeys (1995)

Episode 50 – Conan the Barbarian (1982)

Bill and Ted discuss John Milius’ 1982 film “Conan the Barbarian” drawn from the sword-and-sorcery pulp fiction writings of Robert E. Howard featuring Arnold Schwarzenegger as Conan, a gladiator bent on finding the warlord wizard Thalsu Doom (James Earl Jones) who killed his family. With a phenomenal score by composer Basil Poledouris, Milius brings to the big screen a pre-historical world of high adventure. This is a seminal film that paved the way for an ever-expanding genre.

If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), Excalibur (1981), The Beastmaster (1982)

Episode 49 – Stranger Than Fiction (2006)

Bill and Ted discuss Marc Forster’s 2006 film “Stranger Than Fiction” featuring Will Ferrell as Harold Crick an IRS agent who becomes concerned after hearing the voice narrating his life say, “Little did he know that this simple, seemingly innocuous act would result in his imminent death.” With the help of literary professor Jules Hilbert (Dustin Hoffman), Crick works to find the narrator before it’s too late. This absurd light and surrealist comedy delves into life, love and self-sacrifice with strong supporting performances from Emma Thompson and Maggie Gyllenhaal.

If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: The Truman Show (1998), Punch-Drunk Love (2002), The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013)

2000's, Comedy, Fantasy

Episode 34 – Beetlejuice (1988)

Bill and Ted discuss Tim Burton’s 1988 film “Beetlejuice,” featuring Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis as the ghosts of newly deceased Adam and Barabra Maitlandas they try to spook the NYC high society Deetzes’ and their Goth daughter Lydia played by Winona Ryder who purchased their house in a sleepy New England town. Failing to frighten the Deetzes on their own, they reluctantly turn to the rogue “bio-exorcist” ghost Beetlejuice played to the hilt by Michael Keaton. Burton merges German expressionist style with upbeat Calypso music in this oddly colourful and straggly up-beat ghost story. Of the film Burton says, “It has elements of horror but it’s not really scary, and it’s funny but not really a comedy.” If you enjoyed this film you may also like these: Ted’s Picks: Defending Your Life (1991), The Frighteners (1996), Corpse Bride (2005)

Episode 7 – Brazil (1985)

Bill and Ted discuss Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil,” known for its dystopian themes and film noir style, its cutting satirical humor and vivid dream/nightmare imagery. If you enjoyed this film you may also like these: Blade Runner (1982), Kafka (1991), Dark City (1998)

Episode 6 – The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988)

Bill and Ted discuss Terry Gilliam’s “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen,” known for its inventive art direction, fantastic storytelling and extraordinarily warmhearted investigation of fantasy and reality. If you enjoyed this film you may also like these: Time Bandits (1981), Brazil (1985), The Fisher King (1991)

Episode 3 – Being John Malkovich (1999)

Bill and Ted discuss music video and TV commercial director Spike Jonze’s first feature film “Being John Malkovich,” known for its darkly wry and humorous investigation of existential angst. If you enjoyed this film you may also like these; here are Ted’s Picks: Get Out (2017), Adaptation. (2002), Fight Club (1999)

1990's, Comedy, Fantasy